Prevent Bullies

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New year, same problem. It’s the start of a new school year, which means new classrooms and new friends. For some, it also means facing new bullies. Let’s join the nation and take a stand against bullying one child at a time. What better child to start with than your own? The new school year is the perfect opportunity to start, or continue, the conversation with your kids about the importance of being kind to everyone and avoid being a bully.

A bully isn’t just someone who beats up on another student.According to the CDC,Bullying is any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be
repeated. Bullying may inflict harm or distress on the targeted youth including physical, psychological, social, or educational harm.

It is important to talk to your children about the different types of bullying. They are physical, verbal, and relational. Physical bullying is when one hits, kicks, punches, spits on, or trips another person. Verbal bullying is when someone taunts, calls another person a name, threatens, or makes sexual comments to someone else. The final type is relational, meaning someone is trying to harm another’s personal relationship by isolating them, spreading rumors, or sharing images.

According to stopbullying.gov, children are most likely to be bullied throughout elementary school. One of the key ways you can help prevent bullying is to address the bullying whenever and wherever you see it taking place. It is also important to talk to your children about the importance of being inclusive and kind to everyone, despite differences you may have.

If you would like more information on the warning signs, bullying prevention, or other educational materials, click here.

Vandalism in California

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Many people know what vandalism is. We hear about it, and see it, all of the time. Vandalism is taken very seriously in California. Getting caught vandalizing someone’s property can land a person in jail with hefty fines. While many people think they know what constitutes as vandalism, there are a few acts which fall into that category that people are unaware of.

Vandalism is the classified as the act of maliciously destroying or damaging someone else’s property.

Here is a quick list of acts that qualify as vandalism in the state of California:

  • Writing or painting on something that does not belong to you. This can even include writing your name in the wet cement of a city sidewalk.
  • Damaging a piece of property such as a window on a house or car. This can include breaking something of your significant other’s while fighting.
  • Destroying something beyond the point of repair.

If a person does one of these 3 things, he or she has committed an act of vandalism. If caught by law enforcement, this person can face a fine and possible jail time. The severity of the punishment often depends on how much damage was caused by the act. If the damage amounts to less than $400, than the crime is considered a misdemeanor. The accused person could face, at max, 1 year in jail and a fine of no more than $1,000.

If the damage total is greater than $400, the accused could face anywhere from 1 to 3 years in prison. On top of that, they could face a fine of $10,000, or more. The size of the fine will vary based on how bad the damage is.

Public Defenders v. Private Attorneys

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Public defenders and hired lawyers serve the same purpose: to defend and fight for their client in court. Their goal is to persuade the jury and the judge that their client is innocent of the charges against them. Although they serve the same purpose, both have pros and cons when defending a client.

  • Public Defender

    If a person cannot afford to hire a private attorney, the court will appoint a public defender to them. Therefore, the client does not have to pay for their public defender. The client cannot pick from a selection of public defenders; one is assigned to them. Public defenders are versed in a variety of cases and will be able to take on your case just fine.

However, public defenders do not make as much money as private attorneys, and they often have multiple cases to work on at the same time. Due to this, a public defender may have less time to meet with each client and go through materials. They must split their time across however many cases they have at once.

  • Private Attorney

    For many people, the main problem with hiring a private lawyer rather than a public defender is the cost. Private lawyers can be expensive, and they can be more expensive for serious or prolonged cases than short ones. Nonetheless, the services of a private lawyer are more beneficial than a public defender since the private lawyer will have more time to dedicate to their client. They will have more resources such as extra help from associates, and will likely be able to build a stronger case.

Additionally, lawyers may specialize in certain criminal cases, such as domestic abuse. This means that someone who is in the middle of a domestic abuse case can hire a lawyer who specializes in this, rather than a lawyer who specializes in an unrelated criminal matter. Since clients pay for a private lawyer they selected, the private lawyer is more inclined to perform at their best because their practice and reputation relies on satisfied clients.

If a family can afford a private lawyer, that is the best way to go. If not, hope is not lost. A public defender is ready and willing to take on the case and they will do as much as they can to help the family win.

How to Dress and Act for Court

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If you are trying to get hired, you will dress neatly and offer respectable, mature mannerisms. How you present yourself is equally as important as how technically skilled you are for the position. Similarly, how you present yourself to the jury and the judge in court is very important. After all, these are the people who will be deciding your case. It is not just the evidence and arguments that your lawyer makes on the case. Your appearance is important too.

  • Dress

    Unless you are obligated to appear in an orange jumpsuit because you are being brought in directly from jail, you will want to dress neatly and professionally. Men should wear a collared, buttoned shirt tucked into their long pants. They should have a belt on, and a tie is a plus. Men should wear socks with their shoes, and they may or may not have a jacket on. Women may wear a skirt that should not be more than 2 inches above the knee. Their sleeved blouse should be tucked in, and they should have on flats, or low-heel shoes. Women may also choose to wear long pants with her blouse tucked in. She should wear a sweater, but she can take it off if she gets warm. Across the board, clothing should be clean and free of distracting items like embellishments, wording, rips, and stains.

  • Conduct

    Any defendant must closely follow certain courtroom etiquette, and they will be advised by their lawyer ahead of time. They should only speak when they are asked to, and they must speak clearly. Remaining calm and polite is important, because growing irritated, angry, and argumentative is not going to help their case. They should sit and stand straight. The judge should be acknowledged as “Your Honor.” Looking eye-to-eye with the court shows maturity and seriousness from the defendant, which is a plus.

So much can be said about a person based on their appearance and their in-court demeanor. This is essentially the defendant’s chance to give the jury and the judge a good impression, and hopefully the evidence and facts about the case itself will back the defendant up.

You Do Not Need Drugs to Enjoy a Music Festival

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Large outdoor music festivals and concerts invite attendees to bring their friends, enjoy some music, and have a whole lot of fun. Many outdoor festivals also offer food booths, carnival rides, and other attractions. They are advertised as a whole experience, where some even run for multiple days and offer overnight camping. While the festivals provide a whole lot of fun for attendees, they also cause issues that call law enforcement to break up the fun.

One of the biggest recurring problems with music festivals is the usage and possession of illegal drugs. While alcohol may be served at the event for those who are 21 and older, smuggling in and using drugs of any kind is illegal. Illegal drugs are illegal for a reason. They are harmful to the body, and people react differently to the drugs. Some can “handle” more than others, but any amount is unsafe. The more drugs a body has in the system, the more dangerous they are to themselves and others. When alcohol and drugs are mixed, the person is even more dangerous.

Remember that summertime concerts mean that attendees are burning through their energy under a scorching sun. Staying hydrated with water is imperative in order to avoid exhaustion, dehydration, and fainting. When this happens, paramedics come in, and that is also when they may discover the patient is under the influence.

If the police find someone under the influence of illegal drugs or in possession of them, they will take that person away in handcuffs. The person faces fines and some time in jail. If they are found with an excessive amount of drugs, they can face a few years in prison.

For a person to have a lot of excitement about a concert, only to have it end abruptly because of health complications or because they were caught with drugs is really unfortunate. That is money wasted, lasting memories never had, and time lost. Getting arrested is a lot of stress for a person and it may make them think again before taking drugs at a festival. Hopefully they realize they do not need drugs.

Music festivals are no strangers to some drug abuse and arrests, but it needs to stop before it gets out of control and ruins the fun for everyone.

What’s The Differences between Jail and Prison

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Jail and prison are two places you would never want yourself, or a loved one, to end up. It is a common mistake to believe jail and prison refer to the same institutions. It is true that they are quite similar, but at the same time, there are a number of differences that separate them from each other.

The main difference, first and foremost, is the purpose they serve, and who they serve. Jails house two types of people:

  1. Defendants who are unable to post bail but have yet to be convicted because they are still waiting for trial.
  2. Convicted individuals who are serving a sentence of 1 year or less.

Prisons, house criminals who are serving sentences longer than 1 year.


Local governments or sheriff departments run and operate jails whereas prisons are operated by state and federal governments.


In jail, inmates have access to programs such as work release, boot camp, and other services that address educational and vocational needs. Prisons also offer work release programs, as well as halfway houses and other programs. These are designed to offer inmates a chance to transfer a little more easily from prison back into society as they near the end of their sentence.

In California, there are 33 prisons; less than a handful of these prisons are women-only prisons. California prisons are pretty much maxed out when it comes to the inmate count. In fact, the state’s prisons are overcrowded. This is why the courts are constantly reviewing the inmates and their charges. Any inmates who are serving long sentences for misdemeanor crimes possibly get the chance to be released from prison early. However, even doing this takes some time to get through.

If your loved one is being accused of a crime and has the opportunity to post bail, help them do it. You would not want your loved one to remain in jail, would you? Bring them home. Los Angeles Bail Bond Store can help with this by offering an affordable bail bond.

Contact Los Angeles Bail Bond Store online, or at 562-866-0081.

Is Jail Part of Your Summer Plans?

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Hopefully, you won’t be spending any time behind bars this year. The year may be almost by half over, but summer is just beginning. We are willing to bet that you have got some travel plans in the works, and most definitely, a lot of partying plans. That is the recipe for a great, memorable summer, and we hope it turns out that way.


Getting arrested would definitely make it a memorable summer, but we hope it won’t end up being a part of your summer.


Trust us, getting arrested might be a cool story, but it is quite a pain to deal with. You sit in jail for hours, then you pay off your bail bond and spend the next few months going in and out of the courtroom. You probably miss some work days, and you definitely miss your freedom and time that could be spent with loved ones. It winds up costing quite a bit.

Whatever your plans are for the summer, we just ask that you stay safe, responsible, and smart. Do not do anything stupid or get caught up in an argument. You may know how to handle yourself, but you can never know what another person might do.

If you, or a friend, do end up needing a bail bond, Huntington Park Bail Bond Store will be there to help get you out. We are available to assist you at any time of the day, any day of the year.

Get an Huntington Park Bail Bond Store team member on your side by chatting online or calling 562-866-0081.

Why Choose East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store?

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Whether it is 2 pm on a Wednesday, or 3 AM on a Saturday, you can count on the team at East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store for all of your bail bond needs. East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store knows that people need their help at even the oddest hours of the day, so that is why they never close. Police do not close down after 6 PM; they often make arrests late at night and in the early hours of the morning. Likewise, East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store does not close down. East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store is available 24/7, state-wide in California, to help out anyone and everyone.


In addition to being available at all hours of the day, East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store will provide each client with a custom bail bond payment schedule. With this schedule, the defendant and their loved ones will end up paying 10% of the full bail amount. This means that if the defendant’s bail is $30,000, then the amount they end up paying to East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store is only $3,000.


East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store promises quick and confidential service. They understand that time really is of the essence. Just like you, they want nothing more than to bail your loved one out of jail as soon as possible. This is why in many cases, bail bond approvals can be made over the phone, speeding up the process to get the paperwork cleared. In the instance that the bail bond representative needs to meet with the loved ones in person, the bail agent will travel to the client. This way, the client has one less thing to worry about. Even one less thing to worry about can make a big difference in the client’s stress levels and attitude.

If you ever need a bail bond for yourself or a loved one, consider the team at East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store. They have 30 years of experience in the industry and a great track record of bailing people out of jail affordably and quickly. There is no wonder why so many former clients of theirs highly recommend their services to others in need.

Learn more about how East Los Angeles Bail Bond Store can work with you by chatting with a representative online, or by calling 562-866-0081.

Fines for Misusing Your Drone

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Drone flying can be fun, and get some great aerial footage, but drones are not toys. Anyone who flies a drone must do so within the rules and regulations set by the FAA. Even if a person is not intentionally flying their drone in violation of the restrictions, it is no excuse. Not knowing the rules will not prevent you from needing to fines that are around a few hundred to one, to two thousand dollars. Here are some past instances where a person was mishandling the operation of their drone, and was forced to pay a fine as a result.

  • Tuscaloosa, AL, November 2015
    Gregory Taylor was flying his drone over the Bryant Denny Football stadium during tailgating when it hit a pedestrian. He turned himself in and was fined $1,100.

  • San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2015
    Two drones collided in midair and crashed into the ocean. Both Marcos Plaja-Ferreira and Alberto Haber-flores were each fined $1,100 because of damage to a nearby hotel.

  • Manhattan, New York, July 2014
    A police helicopter chased after a drone that was flying too close to the George Washington Bridge. The NYPD initially reported that the helicopter had to perform evasive maneuvers to avoid colliding with the drone but as it turns out, they embellished this story. As a result, the drone operator, Remy Castro, had his $1,600 fine reduced to $800.

  • Manhattan, New York, September 2013
    David Zablidowski, the first person to ever be fined for flying a drone, flew his drone into several buildings. He was fined $2,200 but his case was settled for $400.

  • Washington DC, May 2015
    It is illegal to fly drones within 30 miles of DC, unless the person has special permission from the government. Damian Dizard and Monica Singleton did not have special permission when they flew their drone within the restricted area. They were fined $3,300 each.

Owning and operating a private or commercial drone requires maturity to do so within the laws. If you, or someone you know, owns a drone, make sure you are well red with what is and is not allowed. You definitely do not want to get police attention, or be fined a few thousand dollars.

Moral Obligation vs. Legal Obligation to Report a Crime

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Some
people believe that if they witness a crime, they must report it to the police; if they do not, they themselves are committing a crime. Actually though, in most cases, this is not true. A person may feel the moral obligation to report the crime, but they do not have a legal obligation to do so.

However, California

Does have mandatory reporting laws for certain people and situations. This applies to people in certain professions, like teachers, therapists, social workers, and medical professions, to name a few. If they suspect abuse against the people they are caring for, they are required to report this to the police.

Back to the general rule: if you are an ordinary citizen and you see someone stealing from a store, you are not required to report it. It may be on your conscience, but the police cannot arrest you for not telling them about the incident. If someone else reported the incident, the police may want to question you and get the details of what you may have witnessed. They still will not arrest you for not reporting the crime yourself.